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Bensalem (215) 638-9933


Blog - Bensalem, PA 19020 Foot Doctor
Monday, 12 April 2021 00:00

Sesamoids are tiny bones located within tendons that connect to muscles—as opposed to most bones which link to one another via joints. The patella, or kneecap, is the largest sesamoid, while the two sesamoids on the bottom of the feet near the big toe (the tibial and the fibular) are pea-sized. Despite their small size, these two sesamoids bear the body’s weight and the tendons they are attached to can become inflamed if they are overly stressed from high heels or activities such as ballet, basketball, or running. This condition is called sesamoiditis and can cause gradually-worsening pain under the ball of the foot, and popping sensations or difficulty bending the big toe. If you experience any of these symptoms, a podiatrist can thoroughly examine you and may utilize an X-ray, bone scan, MRI or ultrasound to determine if you have sesamoiditis. Treatment may involve lifestyle or footwear modifications, medications, or orthotics. Severe cases of sesamoiditis that do not respond to traditional treatment may require surgery.

Sesamoiditis is an unpleasant foot condition characterized by pain in the balls of the feet. If you think you’re struggling with sesamoiditis, contact Dr. Mark Oslick of Bux-mont Foot & Ankle. Our doctor will treat your condition thoroughly and effectively.

Sesamoiditis

Sesamoiditis is a condition of the foot that affects the ball of the foot. It is more common in younger people than it is in older people. It can also occur with people who have begun a new exercise program, since their bodies are adjusting to the new physical regimen. Pain may also be caused by the inflammation of tendons surrounding the bones. It is important to seek treatment in its early stages because if you ignore the pain, this condition can lead to more serious problems such as severe irritation and bone fractures.

Causes of Sesamoiditis

  • Sudden increase in activity
  • Increase in physically strenuous movement without a proper warm up or build up
  • Foot structure: those who have smaller, bonier feet or those with a high arch may be more susceptible

Treatment for sesamoiditis is non-invasive and simple. Doctors may recommend a strict rest period where the patient forgoes most physical activity. This will help give the patient time to heal their feet through limited activity. For serious cases, it is best to speak with your doctor to determine a treatment option that will help your specific needs.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Bensalem, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 05 April 2021 00:00

A burning sensation in the feet can affect any part of the foot and is typically caused by nerve damage. Various conditions can lead to nerve damage in the feet. One of the most common culprits is diabetes. About half of all people with diabetes develop peripheral neuropathy, which affects the nerves of the feet and can produce a burning sensation. Other medical problems that may damage the nerves that supply the feet, and therefore lead to a burning sensation, include small fiber sensory neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, complex regional pain syndrome, excessive alcohol use, and tarsal tunnel syndrome. Conditions that are not related to nerve damage can also produce a burning sensation in the feet. These include athlete’s foot, erythromelalgia, and hypothyroidism, among others. If you have burning feet, please seek the care of a podiatrist. 

Neuropathy

Neuropathy can be a potentially serious condition, especially if it is left undiagnosed. If you have any concerns that you may be experiencing nerve loss in your feet, consult with Dr. Mark Oslick from Bux-mont Foot & Ankle. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment for neuropathy.

What Is Neuropathy?

Neuropathy is a condition that leads to damage to the nerves in the body. Peripheral neuropathy, or neuropathy that affects your peripheral nervous system, usually occurs in the feet. Neuropathy can be triggered by a number of different causes. Such causes include diabetes, infections, cancers, disorders, and toxic substances.

Symptoms of Neuropathy Include:

  • Numbness
  • Sensation loss
  • Prickling and tingling sensations
  • Throbbing, freezing, burning pains
  • Muscle weakness

Those with diabetes are at serious risk due to being unable to feel an ulcer on their feet. Diabetics usually also suffer from poor blood circulation. This can lead to the wound not healing, infections occurring, and the limb may have to be amputated.

Treatment

To treat neuropathy in the foot, podiatrists will first diagnose the cause of the neuropathy. Figuring out the underlying cause of the neuropathy will allow the podiatrist to prescribe the best treatment, whether it be caused by diabetes, toxic substance exposure, infection, etc. If the nerve has not died, then it’s possible that sensation may be able to return to the foot.

Pain medication may be issued for pain. Electrical nerve stimulation can be used to stimulate nerves. If the neuropathy is caused from pressure on the nerves, then surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Bensalem, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 29 March 2021 00:00

The heel is a fatty cushion on the back of the foot that provides padding. Obesity, improperly fitting shoes, injuries and running and jumping on hard surfaces can all lead to heel pain issues. One of the most common causes of heel pain is plantar fasciitis. Plantar fasciitis occurs when the plantar fascia, the band of tissue along the bottom of the foot that connects the heel to the toes, becomes inflamed. Plantar fasciitis is often associated with a heel spur as well. When the plantar fascia tears near the heel, it can bleed and then calcify. These calcium deposits form heel spurs, which can only be detected through an X-ray. If you are struggling with heel pain, please consult with a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis and treatment.

Many people suffer from bouts of heel pain. For more information, contact Dr. Mark Oslick of Bux-mont Foot & Ankle. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Causes of Heel Pain

Heel pain is often associated with plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a band of tissues that extends along the bottom of the foot. A rip or tear in this ligament can cause inflammation of the tissue.

Achilles tendonitis is another cause of heel pain. Inflammation of the Achilles tendon will cause pain from fractures and muscle tearing. Lack of flexibility is also another symptom.

Heel spurs are another cause of pain. When the tissues of the plantar fascia undergo a great deal of stress, it can lead to ligament separation from the heel bone, causing heel spurs.

Why Might Heel Pain Occur?

  • Wearing ill-fitting shoes                  
  • Wearing non-supportive shoes
  • Weight change           
  • Excessive running

Treatments

Heel pain should be treated as soon as possible for immediate results. Keeping your feet in a stress-free environment will help. If you suffer from Achilles tendonitis or plantar fasciitis, applying ice will reduce the swelling. Stretching before an exercise like running will help the muscles. Using all these tips will help make heel pain a condition of the past.

If you have any questions please contact our office located in Bensalem, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Heel Pain
Monday, 22 March 2021 00:00

Custom orthotics, or shoe inserts, should be periodically replaced. Orthotics must fit properly to give you the best results. Protect your feet and ankles!

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